• About Almo Elementary

    The First School.

    The first schools were private ones. One was held in the cove at the home of George Graham, in 1882.Mr.Bealery acted as teacher. The other one was held in the home of Joseph Nicolas and Oscar Hale was the teacher.

    The first district school in Almo was held in 1882, in a log schoolhouse, on the Roman’s location. All the children from Grape Creek went to this school. The other schoolhouses were built in 1882, and in 1883. One (District # 14) was built on a school section. The first teacher was Edward Hoagland. The other one was built in a cove, on a school section where the Belnap claim is now. In 1916, the school consolidated and all children go to the schoolhouse built on the school section. (This site is located in the current townsite in Almo.)

    The information in the paper was found in A Pause for Reflection, written by the Daughters of the Utah Pioneers.

    By Ana Luisa Gonzalez

     

    The First Settlers.

    Most of the early settlers lived in dugouts, but in 1878, 2 log cabins were built. The first one was built by H.D. Durfee on a place owned by John Stines who located here in 1877,and the other cabin was built by

    William Jones, on a location by Buck Holmes.

     

    Later, H.D. Durfee and William Jones bought the land on which the cabins were built. M.B. Durfee, J.T. Taylor, Lee Owsley, and William Miller came here in 1878, but for some cause, only M.B. Durfee and Lee Owsley stayed. The first real home was built by M.B. Durfee in 1879. It was built on the present L.E. Durfee location.

     

    My home is the best in ALMO!!

    The information in the paper was found in A Pause for Reflection, written by the Daughters of the Utah Pioneers.

    By Ana Luisa Gonzalez

     

     

    How Almo got its name.

    In 1879, a number of people came and settled hereThere was Matt Durfee, H.D. Durfee, H.R. Cahoon, Sr . , Val Brackenbury, Thomas Edwards, William Jones, John Lowe, Charles Ward, Alf Ward, and Robert Wake. Mrs. Helen was the first white woman to settle in Almo.

    In 1879, the settlers met together to name the village. There was quite an argument in regards to name. Some wanted to name it Durfeeville, but Almo was suggested, and all agreed to that name.

     

    There are three versions as to the meaning of Almo. One is that Myro B. Durfee and Thomas O. King derived the name from the Spanish "Alamo," meaning "Great Battle." Another is that it means "Cotton Wood Country." Still another interpretation is that it is an Indian word meaning "Plenty Waters."

     

    I like Almo’s name a lot , I mean a lot!!

     

    The information in the paper was found in A Pause for Reflection, written by the Daughters of the Utah Pioneers.

    By Ana Luisa Gonzalez